Using KirkpatrickÕs Taxonomy of Training Criteria to Evaluate the Effectiveness of a Continuing Education Course.

Purpose/Hypothesis : The intent of this study was to evaluate the impact of an evidence-based hip and knee examination and mobilization continuing education course on a group of physical therapists in a geriatric setting using an augmented version of KirkpatrickÕs taxonomy of training criteria. KirkpatrickÕs taxonomy is a framework commonly used to evaluate the impact of training programs at four levels: (1) learner reactions including satisfaction and utility judgment; (2) changes in learner knowledge (new skills); (3) transfer of new knowledge and skill to the work environment; and (4) achievement of desired outcomes such as patient outcomes.Number of Subjects : Fourteen physical therapy practitioners (11 PTs and 3 PTAs) volunteered to participate in this study.Materials/Methods : Participants attended two 2-hour sessions one week apart (4 total hours lecture/lab). An immediate post-course evaluation assessed levels 1 and 2. A pre-course and 6 month post-course survey assessed changes in levels 2 and 3. We used descriptive statistics to assess Level 1 (satisfaction) and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test to assess changes in levels 2 and 3.Results : Level 1 Learner Satisfaction: - 100% of participants rated the course Òwell organizedÓ - 100% of participants agreed the course would Òimprove effectiveness as a clinicianÓ - 89% of participants reported that they Òplan to change my practiceÓ as a result of attending the course Level 2 Changes in learner knowledge: Immediate post-course survey - Increased knowledge of evidence supporting use of mobilization (p<.001), - Increased skill level of hip and knee joint mobilization (p<.001) Six months post-course survey - Increased knowledge of evidence supporting use of mobilization (p=.013) - Increased skill level of hip and knee joint mobilization (p=.005) Level 3 Transfer of new knowledge (all 6 months post-course): - Increased use of an evidence based examination tool (Scour test) (p=.54) - Increased frequency of use of hip and knee mobilization for appropriate patients (p=.46) - No significant changes were noted in use of evidence based outcome assessment tools were noted due to current use by participantsConclusions : Using KirkpatrickÕs Taxonomy, we determined participants were satisfied with the course and their increased knowledge of evidence-based examination of the lower limb and mobilization. However, their transfer of knowledge to practice was limited. Next steps in this research are to incorporate evidence based training methodologies to reduce the Òtransfer problemÓ and move beyond self-report to verify transfer of knowledge to the clinical setting (KirkpatrickÕs Level 4) by obtaining: (1) CPT codes to verify intervention procedures and (2) results of functional assessments to verify patient outcomes.Clinical Relevance : The use of continuing education to increase the prevalence of evidence-based practice requires longitudinal evaluation using an established framework to link changes in knowledge to changes in practice.

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  • Control #: 1717278
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Gilbert M. Willett, Grace C. Johnson, Katherine J. Jones, Anne M. Skinner
  • Keywords: Kirkpatricks model|continuing education

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