Job Satisfaction of University of North Dakota Physical Therapy Alumni

Purpose/Hypothesis : As part of program assessment, University of North Dakota Physical Therapy alumni are contacted every 5 years regarding personal and professional demographics and job satisfaction levels. The purpose of this study is to analyze job satisfaction of alumni over a 15 year time period.Number of Subjects : The number of respondents ranged from 322 to 437 for each survey year, with a total of 1,545 full-time practicing physical therapists (PT) in this study.Materials/Methods : Surveys were mailed to alumni in 1994, 1999, 2004, and 2009. Demographic data was collected, including practice setting, position, APTA membership, degree level, gender, and geographical location. The Job Descriptive Index (JDI) (work, pay, opportunity for promotion, supervision, and coworkers) and the Job in General (JIG) measured job satisfaction; ratings could range from 0-54 with 54 being most satisfied. Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA and MW U tests were used to determine differences between groups with alpha set at .05. Bonferroni correction was used for MW U post hoc tests.Results : Overall median ratings were: work - 48, pay - 45, opportunity for promotion - 18, supervision - 46, coworker - 50, and JIG - 48. Within each survey year, median ratings were highest for co-workers (49-51) and lowest for opportunity for promotion (14-18). Between survey years, there was consistent satisfaction with coworkers. The 1994 respondents had the highest levels of satisfaction with pay and the lowest satisfaction with work and supervision. Respondents from 2004 and 2009 were similar in all categories of ratings. Between settings, satisfaction with pay was similar; all other ratings varied. PTs in an academic setting had the highest levels of satisfaction in every category. Between positions, owners and academic directors/faculty had the highest satisfaction scores. APTA members were more satisfied than non-APTA members with pay and opportunity for promotion. Physical therapists with BSPT and DPT degrees were more satisfied with pay than therapists with MPT degrees. Men felt more satisfied with opportunities for promotion than did women. Practice location did not influence satisfaction, except in opportunity for promotion, where PTs from the West were significantly more satisfied than those from the Midwest.Conclusions : Practicing alumni seem relatively satisfied in most categories of the JDI/JIG, with the exception of opportunities for promotion. PTs working in academia showed the highest levels of satisfaction compared to PTs in other settings or positions.Clinical Relevance : Opportunities for promotion appear to be limited. Will certifications, residencies, and the entry-level DPT affect opportunities for promotion within health care systems? And finally, academic directors and faculty express high satisfaction. Could greater job satisfaction encourage therapists to pursue a career in academia? Future research is needed.

BACK to Abstract Results

  • Control #: 1722266
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Renee L. Mabey, Madelynne Roth, Kayla Stevermer
  • Keywords: job satisfaction|JDI/JIG|physical therapist

BACK to Abstract Results