Imparting the Art and Science of Teaching to the Educators of the Future

Purpose : The rising number of PT students and the growing number of DPT programs directly impacts the quantity of qualified professionals needed to provide classroom and clinical instruction. Demonstration of proficiency with academic teaching and clinical instruction surpasses graduate outcome expectations for most DPT programs. While efforts have occurred to enhance post-graduate training and mentoring opportunities, academic programs should consider expanding traditional instruction to allow students professional practice opportunities to develop teaching skills beyond that required for the delivery of patient care.Description : A terminal, full-time, elective clinical experience was developed within an accredited DPT program to provide opportunity to learn and practice clinical and lab instructional skills. In addition to the requirement to demonstrate entry-level proficiency with his/her own skills per the CPI, each participating student serves as a co-clinical instructor (CI) for a pair of students less advanced in their academic tenure from the same University. Participating students are required to complete a series of modules on topics including, but not limited to: defining the role of the CI, practicing effective communication, incorporating learning styles/approaches consistent with the adult learner, managing personality/style differences, promoting performance change, and grading/evaluating cognitive, psychomotor, and affective performance. Through modeling and mentoring by APTA-credentialed Cls, students gain skill in facilitating student-client interactions, confirming accuracy of student-obtained measurements, progressing critical analysis and problem-solving skills, and providing feedback on documentation and billing practices. Providing 2Ð3 hours of classroom laboratory assistance/week is another requirement of the elective clinical experience. Again, through mentoring and modeling, students actively instruct and test students on foundational PT skills in the classroom setting.Summary of Use : Students derive many benefits from participating in opportunities specifically designed to develop skills as both a clinical and classroom educator. Survey data of participating students revealed an increased professional commitment to serve as a future CI and to pursue APTA-credentialing. Pairing a more seasoned student with a newer learner also provides encouragement and emotional support that should not be under-valued. For academic institutions, there is significant benefit in grooming a pool of highly qualified associated faculty to help with delivery of the curriculumImportance to Members: Through early mentoring, skill and confidence with student instruction may increase and breed stronger commitment to future contributions in this venue. Training students in alternate models of clinical education, namely the 2:1 model, allows them to carry to future clinics the skills and information learned so that others might benefit. Overall, efforts to provide mentorship to the clinical and academic partners of the future appear a worthy endeavor.

BACK to Abstract Results

  • Control #: 1723462
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Karla A. Bell, Cathy Ciolek, Ellen Wruble Hakim
  • Keywords: student mentoring|clinical instruction|clinical education

BACK to Abstract Results