ItÕs A Life Saver, But Will They Remember? A study of CPR Retention

Purpose/Hypothesis : CPR is required for all health professions students at Nova Southeastern University (NSU). The purpose of this study was to determine CPR retention of revised 2011 American Heart Association Guidelines (AHA) by Physical Therapy (PT) and Optometry (OD) students 6-12 months after initial training to see if retention was different than on pre 2011 guidelines. The researchers hypothesized that AHA changes in content and teaching would not result in change from pre-2011studies. They also hypothesized that periodic refreshers or more frequent training may be required; especially for health professional students that may have to initiate or perform CPR. Because the guidelines are new, minimal retention data was identified for the 2011 criteria.Number of Subjects : Af 85 students participated in the written ; PT = 33 and OD = 52. 15/85, every 4th subject, participated in the psychomotor component.Materials/Methods : This study looked at retention by retesting CPR knowledge in PT and OD students with the AHA written exam and cognitive/psychomotor retention by replication of a case study and performance of CPR. PT and OD students were selected as they often affiliate at sites without code teams. The psychomotor component and the re-test of a randomly selected subgroup was analyzed by an AHA certified trainer for using the AHA skills checklist. Retesting was done within 6 Ð 12 months of initial certification. Materials included the AHA multiple choice exam (used with permission of the AHA), resuscitation mannequins, portable defibrillators, and face masks.Results : All students had passed their initial certifications. 2/85 passed the written based on AHA grading criteria. None of the 15/85 students selected for the psychomotor component successfully passed; with most failing the critical elements on the AHA skills checklist as well.Conclusions : A review of the literature for the pre-2011 certifications revealed decreasing retention in health professionals over time. The more a health professional actually administered CPR the better the retention. As saving lives and CPR competence are critical in health care, this study should provide valuable information. Although the guidelines have been simplified to some degree, and AHA teaching methodology modified to accommodate different learning styles, this study showed no significant difference in retention over time between old and revised versions of the test.Clinical Relevance : In 2011, the American Heart Association (AHA) published revised CPR guidelines for professionals. CPR is critical immediately following a cardiac or respiratory emergency. While former CPR standards are known to saves lives, retention was shown to deteriorate over time amongst all trained populations. As health profession students have direct encounters with patients (and others) during their clinical education experiences, they are required to be CPR certified. Poor retention may put patients at risk. This study suggests that even with the revised content and teaching methodology, more frequent training than every 2 years may be indicated.

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  • Control #: 1725428
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Debra F. Stern, Leah Nof, Kevin Nugent, Eva Duchnowski
  • Keywords: CPR|Retention|revised guidelines

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