Quantitative Assessment of the Attitudes of Physical Therapy Students towards Team-Based Learning in a Gross Anatomy Course

Purpose : Didactic lectures and dissection laboratory sessions have been the traditional teaching strategy in gross anatomy courses in physical therapists education. Physical therapy faculty have recognized the importance of the clinical application of knowledge acquired in foundational science courses in preparing students for their clinical internships, the National Physical Therapy Examination, and employment. Team-Based Learning (TBL) is a well-defined instructional strategy developed by Dr. Michaelsen that engages students in active learning. However, much of the literature reporting positive student attitudes towards TBL is anecdotal. Despite the lack of quantitative evidence in the literature regarding student perceptions toward the effectiveness of TBL, numerous educational programs have implemented this strategy. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes of DPT students as to the effectiveness of TBL implemented in a gross anatomy course using a valid and reliable assessment tool.Description : TBL was implemented in the gross anatomy course at the University of North Florida in 2008 with anecdotal reporting from students about the positive effects including an increase pass rate for the course. In order to better evaluate the effects of TBL, a valid and reliable quantitative assessment tool was selected. The Team-Based Learning Student Assessment Instrument© (TBL-SAI) was administered to three cohorts of DPT students, class of 2013, 2014 and 2015. This 33-item assessment tool uses a 5-point Likert scale with three indicating neutral attitudes, to measure student perceptions in three areas. They are 1) Accountability, 2) Preference for Lecture or Team-Based Learning format, and 3) Student Satisfaction.Summary of Use : On the Accountability subscale, 82% of the scores for all three cohorts were greater than neutral, indicating a high level of accountability. On the Preference for Lecture or TBL format subscale, 82% of the scores for all three cohorts were greater than neutral, indicating the preference for TBL was high. In the Student Satisfaction subscale, 92% of the scores for all three cohorts were greater than neutral, indicating student satisfaction was also high. Finally, on the overall total, scores ranged from 88-146, based on a score of 99 as neutral, greater than 92% of the students had a favorable experience with TBL.Importance to Members: This study provides valid and reliable evidence that TBL improves studentsÕ attitudes in accountability by requiring students to prepare before class so that they can meaningfully contribute to the team learning experience. In addition, students feel more satisfaction with their learning by engaging in clinically related problem solving activities. And lastly, students report better ability to recall material in a TBL format then in traditional lecture format. These positive attitudes have the potential to enhance physical therapy education and provide a more positive teaching and learning environment.

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  • Control #: 1726680
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Mary Lundy, Beven Livingston, Shana Harrington
  • Keywords: Team-Based Learning|Gross Anatomy|Student Satisfaction

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