ÒFlippingÓ for blended learning: a case study on using online and in-person teaching methods in a physical therapy course

Purpose/Hypothesis : With recent advances in technology, many educators use a ÒflippedÓ or ÒinvertedÓ teaching model, where content is delivered online with in-person class sessions reserved for discussion, problem-solving, and application. However, little research has been done to determine which online and in-person teaching methods result in optimal student satisfaction, engagement, performance, and learning.Number of Subjects : Thirty-seven individuals enrolled in the Control of Human Movement class in the entry-level DPT program at the University of Kansas Medical Center.Materials/Methods : Course content was delivered online using Powerpoint slide lessons, video lessons, and Facebook discussion. Four in-person class sessions were conducted to discuss and apply content delivered online. A Likert scale survey assessed satisfaction and perception of the different teaching techniques. The number of Facebook posts and ÒlikesÓ were counted for each student to indicate engagement. Performance on the final exam was used to assess learning of the course content. Frequency data, Kruskal-Wallis test, and SpearmanÕs rho and Pearson correlations were used to analyze data.Results : Eighty-one percent of students agreed that the teaching methods used in the course were effective methods to deliver the course content, 73% agreed the teaching methods were efficient methods to deliver the course content, 78% agreed they were satisfied with the teaching methods used in this course, and 78% agreed the teaching methods enhanced their learning of the course material. When asked to select a preferred teaching method in general, 32% selected traditional in-person lecture, 56% selected on-line Powerpoint lessons, and 12% selected video lessons. There was a significant difference in satisfaction between groups (p=.004) based on preferred teaching method; students who prefer Powerpoint lessons were the most satisfied with the teaching methods used in this course, and students who prefer traditional in-person lecture were the least satisfied. There were no significant correlations between overall satisfaction and Facebook engagement (rs=.045, p=.794), exam performance (rs=-.029, p=.865) or hours spend per week on the course (rs=.233, p==.166). There was also no significant correlation between exam performance and Facebook engagement (r=-.002, p=.992) or hours spent per week on the course (r=-.022, p=.899).Conclusions : Despite variable preference in teaching methods, the vast majority of students had a positive overall perception of the ÒflippedÓ learning model used in this course. Although student satisfaction was related to preferred teaching method, there were no relationships between overall satisfaction and online engagement, time spent on the course, or exam performance. It remains unclear what factors impact satisfaction with specific online and in-person teaching methods.Clinical Relevance : Educators in DPT programs should consider adopting ÒflippedÓ learning or hybrid models of instruction for more efficient and effective delivery of course content.

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  • Control #: 1727087
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Catherine Siengsukon, Kendra Gagnon, Eric Vidoni, Tarang K. Jain, Mayis Aldughmi
  • Keywords: flipped model|online|survey

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