Mentoring: It's Not Just for Students

Purpose/Hypothesis : As need for qualified physical therapy faculty expands, new faculty may come to academia without formal training as a professor, facing challenges of tripartite roles;teaching, research and service while pursuing academic excellence. Faculty mentoring has been discussed in other disciplines as a model for new faculty seeking guidance & support in their new academic roles. Presently, there is limited information on the nature of mentoring opportunities for new PT faculty. The purpose of this study is to investigate the current state of mentorship for PT faculty and gain insight on characteristics, perceptions and perceived benefits of mentorship relationship model using Health Sciences Faculty Mentoring (HSFM) Survey.Number of Subjects : Study participants; new full time PT faculty members; contract faculty or tenure track eligible (n=66)Materials/Methods : HSFM survey items includes faculty demographics, characteristics of mentoring relationship, functions of a mentor and perceptions of perceived influence of mentoring on academic success. Email solicitation was sent to faculty members listed on websites of PT programs (CAPTE accredited) (n=211) and via education section list serve with invitation and instructions for accessing, completing the on-line HSFM survey.Results : This qualitative study used descriptive and inferential statistics to address the research questions. Faculty reporting mentorship (22% n=15) at their institution with department faculty (59%) or supervisor (38%) or others as mentors. As new faculty, respondents rated moderate/ extreme stress in areas; transitioning from clinician to faculty (60%): teaching responsibilities (30%), research productivity (28%): formal expectations to achieve tenure, promotion or reappointment (25%) and unspoken rules/ expectations of the academy(23%). Preferred attributes of mentorship identified nurturing (58%) or educational models (39%) over an apprenticeship model (3%). Perceptions of influence of mentorship on academic success ranked improved teaching (88%), research productivity (70%) service engagement (50%) and reappointment, tenure, promotion (75%) as important/very important for faculty. Faculty without mentors identified areas where mentorship would have been preferred; formal/informal advice on tenure and promotion (59%), advice on research/grant proposals/funding (57%), someone to trust (59%), provide feedback, criticism, advice and support (57%) .Faculty identified challenges to a mentoring relationship as a lack of university recognition and,formal mentoring plans and time constraints of facultyConclusions : Study conclusions support previous findings of other faculty groups in that PT faculty members who participate in mentoring opportunities/relationships are more likely to be satisfied with their work, committed to the mission of their department and university and remain at the institution,Clinical Relevance : Mentoring new PT faculty in their tripartite roles in the Academy can supports their transition from clinician to academician which may enhance their ability to effectively meet the needs and responsibilities of an academician.

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  • Control #: 1727247
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2014
  • Authors: Genevieve Pinto Zipp, Catherine Maher
  • Keywords: Mentoring|mentor relationship|Faculty

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