Perceived Value of CAPTEÕs Topics of Scholarly Activity Among Clinical Instructors

Purpose: Clinical Instructors (CIs) serve a critical role in the education of physical therapy students by bridging the gap between didactic preparation and clinical competence. In that role, CIs assess the translation of academic coursework into clinical skills and provide meaningful insights to physical therapy faculty about studentsÕ competency. Also, CIsÕ perspectives about faculty expertise in different types of scholarly activity can help guide the translation of scholarly activity for student development.Methods/Description: An electronic survey was distributed to CIs within a departmental clinical education database and additional CIs were recruited at a state professional meeting. Face validity analysis was completed on the survey. In the survey, CIs were asked to rate and rank the importance of the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy EducationÕs (CAPTE) topics of scholarly activity, which include scholarship of discovery, integration, application/practice, teaching, and engagement. Rating responses were from 1(very important) to 5(unimportant). Ranking responses were from 1(most important) to 5(least important). 263 Clinical Instructors were contacted ÊResults/Outcomes: The response rate was 43% (113 of 263 contacted CIs responded). The ratings of importance for scholarship of application/practice were significantly greater than all other areas of scholarship. The ratings of importance for discovery, integration and teaching were significantly greater than scholarship of engagement. The rankings of importance showed similar findings with scholarship of application/practice ranked significantly higher than all other areas. Scholarship of integration ranked significantly greater than scholarship of teaching. There were no significant differences in ratings or rankings of perceived value of scholarly activity topics between differing entry level PT degrees. Additionally, there were no significant differences in overall ratings or rankings between APTA members and non-members. However, there was a trend (p= .06) for APTA members to rank application less important than non-APTA members. There were no significant differences between APTA credentialed CIs and non-credentialed CIs in overall ratings (pÕs=.10-.94) or rankings (pÕs =.14-.76) with the exception that APTA credentialed CIs ranked discovery significantly less important than non-credentialed CIs.Conclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: CIs are in a unique position to facilitate the transition of students to clinicians and to evaluate the importance of faculty expertise in different types of scholarly activity. The CIs we sampled rated and ranked the scholarship of application/practice significantly higher than all other types of scholarship defined by CAPTE regardless of the CIsÕ academic preparation or their relationships with APTA. Clinical instructors rate and rank faculty expertise in the scholarship of application/practice as a high priority. Allocation of resources should support this type of scholarly endeavor by faculty.References: CAPTE Evaluative Criteria PT Programs Accreditation Handbook. Alexandria, VA: Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education; 2011. CAPTE Position Papers Accreditation Handbook. Alexandria, VA: Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education; 2011. Ê

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  • Control #: 1989586
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: Teresa Briedwell, Dana Martin, Erin A. Dannecker
  • Keywords:

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