Clinical Instructor Use of Evidence-based Practice Ê

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP) by clinical instructors (CIs), and to determine whether CI age, highest degree, or American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) membership status are associated with EBP utilization.Ê ÊMethods/Description: This study used a modified version of the Clinical Effectiveness and Evidence Based Practice Questionnaire to electronically collect data on CI characteristics and the use of EBP.Ê ÊÊParticipants (1,500) were recruited using a convenience sample of those registered as CIs in the APTA Physical Therapist (PT) Clinical Performance Instrument Web database.Ê Included were PTs who were CIs for student physical therapists (SPTs) in the U.S. Those who had not supervised at least one SPT in the past year were excluded.ÊÊ ÊResults/Outcomes: A total of 376 surveys were included in data analysis. Of all respondents, 98.7% (n = 371) reported EBP occurred to some extent, ranging from rarely to frequently:Ê 12.0% (n = 45) rarely, 75.5% (n = 284) occasionally to sometimes, and 11.2% (n = 42) frequently.Ê The frequency with which CIs reported performing each of the five steps of EBP varied.Ê Almost half of the participants reported frequently integrating evidence into clinical instruction (n = 186, 49.5%) and evaluating practice outcomes (n = 175, 46.5%).Ê Critical appraisal of the literature was reported to occur less often:Ê never 6.9% (n = 26), rarely 14.1% (n = 53), occasionally to sometimes 56.9% (n = 188), and frequently 22.1% (n = 83).Ê EBP use by CIs was not related to age (H = 3.469, p = .628), highest degree (H = 2.10, p = .351), or APTA membership status (z = -2.235, p = .023).Ê ÊConclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: Not all CIs report using EBP, the frequency of reported use varied, and some CIs report using only portions of the EBP construct.Ê Evidence-based practice is a required and important aspect of SPT education.Ê For SPTs to develop EBP competence, practice is needed.Ê Practice most effectively occurs during clinical education as EBP instruction applied to actual clinical conditions is more likely to change EBP skill than classroom instruction.Ê In addition, students rely heavily upon CIs as a source of information, making CIs ideal role models.Ê Good EBP role models can positively influence student attitude about and use of EBP.Ê Thus, routine use and role modeling of EBP by CIs is essential to the future of SPT clinical education. Ê ÊReferences: Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. Evaluative criteria PT programs. 2011.Ê http://www.capteonline.org/uploadedFiles/CAPTEorg/About_CAPTE/Resources/Accreditation_Handbook/EvaluativeCriteria_PT.pdf. Accessed march 28, 2014.Ê Del Mar C, Glasziou P, Mayer D.Ê Teaching evidence based medicine.Ê BMJ. 2004; 329: 989-990. Liason Internation.Ê APTA CPI Web. 2013.Ê https://cpi2.amsapps.com/user_session/new.Ê Accessed March 28, 2014.Ê Olsen NR, Bradley P, Lomborg K, Norvedt, MW.Ê Evidence based practice in clinical physiotherapy education:Ê a qualitative interpretive description.Ê BMC Med Educ. 2013; 13(52): 1-14. Scherer S, Smith MB. Teaching evidence-based practice in academic and clinical settings. Cardiopulm Phys Ther. 2002;13(2):23Ð27. Straus SE, Glasziou P, Richardson WS, Haynes RB. Evidence-based Medicine. How to Practice and Teach It. 5th ed. Sudbury, MA: Elsevier; 2011. Upton D, Lewis B. Clinical effectiveness and EBP: design of a questionnaire. Br J Ther Rehabil. 1998; 5(12):647Ð650. Ê

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  • Control #: 1991042
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: Debra A. Bierwas, Joan S. Leafman, Lisa Wallace, Donald Shaw
  • Keywords:

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