Preparing Physical Therapy Students to Deliver Interprofessional Community-Based Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Programs: Collaboration Between a DPT Program and a Medically-Oriented GymÊ

Purpose: The evolving implementation of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA)1 presents challenges and opportunities for current and future physical therapist (PT) education and practice in the arena of health promotion and disease/injury prevention (HP/DP). In 1999, Rimmer2 concluded that health promotion for individuals with disabilities Òmust become a major focus for the new millenniumÓ (p. 501).Ê Since then, PTs have made steady advances in integrating HP/DP interventions into clinical practice, but community-based HP/DP programs developed and/or implemented by PTs are not yet considered mainstream. Informal surveys also confirm that few PT students gain experience with community-based HP/DP services as part their required clinical education experiences. The purpose of this presentation is to share an example of an innovative, interprofessional HP/DP learning activity involving a partnership between a PT education program and a Medically-Oriented Gym (MOG).Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê Ê ÊÊMethods/Description: The MOG in this collaboration belongs to a network of 25 MOG establishments in 9 states across the country,3 and is staffed by an interprofessional team of health professionals and exercise specialists. The overarching goals of the MOG are to maintain or improve functional independence and to slow the rate of functional decline of individuals with chronic health conditions who do not qualify for ÒtraditionalÓ physical therapy care but would benefit from a structured and supervised exercise program. Ê In the Fall semester of 2013, Doctor of Physical (DPT) students enrolled in a required HP/DP course partnered with nursing students and staff at the MOG to develop and implement a 10-week exercise and education program for individuals with Type II Diabetes. Students led all exercise and educational sessions under the supervision of faculty and MOG staff. DPT students also developed a business plan designed to ensure the long-term viability of their program in a concurrently offered, required administration course.Ê Ê ÊÊÊResults/Outcomes: Students wrote and received a grant from the universityÕs Center for Excellence in Interprofessional Education to support the costs of recruitment flyers, program supplies, and MOG staff. Students also received in-kind donations of equipment from Partners for World Health, a local non-profit agency, in exchange for volunteer hours. They successfully implemented and evaluated the 10-week program using pre- and post-program outcome measures. An abstract of their work was accepted for presentation at the 2014 All Together Better Health VII Conference.ÊÊÊÊ ÊÊ Ê Ê Ê Ê ÊÊÊÊÊ Ê Ê ÊConclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: The partnership between the university and MOG provides a feasible and sustainable model for educating DPT and other health professions students about the importance, relevance, and viability of interprofessional community-based HP/DP programs. This model and resulting programs show promise as a means for enhancing HP/DP student learning outcomes in PT education.Ê ÊÊÊ ÊÊReferences: 1. Prevention and Wellness. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services website. http://www.hhs.gov/healthcare/prevention/index.html. ÊAccessed April 2, 2014. 2. Rimmer J. Health promotion for people with disabilities: the emerging paradigm shift from disability prevention to secondary conditions. Phys Ther. 1999; 79: 495-502. Ê 3. Locations. The MOG Group website. http://themoggroup.com/locations-2/. Accessed April 2, 2014.Ê

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  • Control #: 1991666
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: Michael Sheldon, William J. McCormick, Jaclyn Chadbourne
  • Keywords:

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