Interprofessional Practice: Physical Therapy in Family Medicine Interprofessional Teaching ClinicsÊ

Purpose: Clinical practice is an ideal venue for training health professions students interprofessionally.Ê The purpose of this project is to describe the DPT student experience and the role physical therapy plays in two interprofessional (IP) teaching clinics associated with Family Medicine.Ê ÊÊMethods/Description: Currently, DPT students voluntarily participate in two different interprofessional teaching clinics.Ê When DPT students participate, they work collaboratively with other health professions students (e.g. Pharmacy, Medicine, Nursing, Occupational Therapy, Social Work, etc.) to provide care to patients who are scheduled to see their primary care physician.Ê Students huddle interprofessionally prior to seeing the patient, conduct the subjective exam as a team, huddle interprofessionally after the subjective exam, report out to faculty preceptors as a team, and then complete the visit with the patientÕs primary care physician as a team. Following their experience in the IP teaching clinics, DPT students are asked to complete a survey that contains both quantitative and qualitative questions. These IP clinics will be a required part of the integrated clinical experiences for the incoming cohort of DPT students.ÊResults/Outcomes: Seventeen DPT students have voluntarily participated in the IP teaching clinics for a total of 208 hours over the past 2 years; five have completed their experience with these clinics. Of these 5 students, 4 completed the post-experience survey.Ê Three students rated their experience with these clinics as ÒVery GoodÓ; one rated it as ÒExcellentÓ. ÊThree students rated the experience as ÒVery BeneficialÓ for other DPT students to participate in as part of their graduate education; one rated it as ÒExtremely BeneficialÓ.Ê On a scale from 0 (not at all important) to 10 (extremely important), 3 students rated interprofessional education as a Ò9Ó; one student rated it is a Ò10Ó.Ê Qualitative responses revealed that these students learned about the importance of advocating for their professional role as a physical therapist and that IP collaborative practice provides optimal patient care.Ê These students also expressed an increased desire to consult with other healthcare professionals in future physical therapy practice in order to advocate for their patients and provide the best patient care. Lastly, the survey also revealed that these students learned from and felt valued by the other professions participating in these clinics.Conclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: Opportunities for DPT students to participate in a collaborative practice environment is a robust means for developing collaborative practice ready clinicians. ÊThe opportunity to work together in interprofessional teams helps students acquire the necessary knowledge, critical skills and behaviors needed to become effective members of interprofessional healthcare teams.References: 1. Thibault, G.E. and S.C. Schoenbaum. (2013). Forging collaboration within academia and between academia and health care delivery organizations: Importance, successes and future work. Commentary, Institute of Medicine, Washington, DC. http://www.iom.edu/forgingcollaboration. Accessed 4-3-14. 2. Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation. (2013). Transforming patient care: Aligning interprofessional education with clinical practice redesign.Ê http://macyfoundation.org/docs/macy_pubs/JMF_TransformingPatientCare_Jan2013Conference_fin_Web.pdf. Accessed 4-3-14. 3. Interprofessional Education Collaborative Expert Panel. (2011). Core competencies for interprofessional collaborative practice: Report of an expert panel. Washington, D.C.: Interprofessional Education Collaborative. http://www.aacn.nche.edu/education-resources/ipecreport.pdf. Accessed 4-3-14. 4. World Health Organization (WHO). (2010). Framework for action on interprofessional education & collaborative practice. Geneva: World Health Organization. http://whqlibdoc.who.int/hq/2010/WHO_HRH_HPN_10.3_eng.pdf?ua=1. Accessed 4-3-14. 5. Jacobsen, F., Fink, A.M., Marcussen, V., Larsen, K., Torben B., Hansen, A. (2009). Interprofessional undergraduate clinical learning: Results from a three year project in a Danish Interprofessional Training Unit. Journal of Interprofessional Care, 23(1), 30Ð40. 6. Copley, J.A., Allison, H.D., Hill, A.E., Moran, M.C., et al. (2007). Making interprofessional education real: A university clinic model. Australian Health Review, 31, 3; 351-357.

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  • Control #: 1994736
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: Stephen Jernigan, Jana Zaudke
  • Keywords:

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