A Simplified Method for Evaluating Cardiopulmonary Auscultation Skills in Physical Therapy Students Ê

Purpose: Describe a simple method for evaluating auscultation competency in physical therapy students at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC). ÊMethods/Description: The Cardiopulmonary Physical Therapy course (PT 727) at MUSC is in the fourth semester of a nine semester DPT curriculum. In addition to in-class skills review and practice, students polish their cardiopulmonary skills at the MUSC Healthcare Simulation Center using high fidelity human simulation (HFHS). During the HFHS experience students assess and interpret peripheral pulses, blood pressure, respiration, heart and breath sounds, electrocardiograms, and blood gas values. A participant survey administered by the Simulation Center revealed that 100% of responding PT students rated their overall experience with HFHS as good to exceptional. This positive student assessment is consistent with a previously published paper detailing the use of HFHS to prepare physical therapy students for the ICU setting.1 During their final academic semester, students must successfully complete a comprehensive Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE). Included in the OSCE are two stations at which students must demonstrate competency in cardiopulmonary evaluation and treatment. To evaluate student proficiency/competency with auscultation, we have implemented the use of a simplified simulation method using a basic CPR manikin with a speaker implanted in the chest cavity. With the use of a laptop computer, a variety of pre-recorded heart and breath sounds can be accessed online and introduced to the speaker implanted in the chest cavity of the manikin.2 When students perform their assessment on the manikin during the OSCE, they are evaluated on their ability to accurately locate the ausculatory sites, listen with their stethoscopes for an appropriate period of time, and correctly identify the pre-recorded heart and breath sounds. ÊResults/Outcomes: During the OSCE, ninety-five percent of students, 59 out of 62, correctly located the heart auscultation sites and identified the heart sound(s) on their first attempt. Results at the pulmonary station were similar, with ninety-five percent of students correctly locating breath sound auscultation sites and identifying the recorded breath sound(s) on their first attempt.Ê A post-OSCE survey was administered to gain insight into student perceptions on the use of this simplified simulation method. Thirty-seven students completed the survey, with over 75% percent of respondents indicating that they agreed or strongly agreed that this manner of evaluation: -Was an effective way toÊ evaluate their auscultation skills -Increased their confidence with auscultation -Should be included in future OSCEÕsConclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: Based on student performance and student perception, we conclude that a simplified simulation method utilizing a basic CPR manikin, laptop computer, and internet access to pre-recorded heart and breath sounds is a viable means of evaluating physical therapy student auscultation competency. ÊReferences: 1. Shoemaker MJ, Riemersma L, Perkins, R. Use of high fidelity human simulation to teach physical therapist decision making skills for the ÊÊÊ intensive care setting. Cardiopulm Phys Ther J. 2009;20(1):13-18. 2. Easy Auscultation http://www.easyauscultation.com/. Accessed October, 2013.

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  • Control #: 1995740
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: David Sword, Kenneth J. Thomas, Holly Wise, Debora Brown
  • Keywords:

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