The Effect of Physical Therapy Students' Clinical Experiences on Clinician Productivity

Purpose: ÊA Doctor of Physical Therapy (PT) degree is granted when both a curriculum of classroom didactics strictly supervised by the professionÕs accreditation process and entry-level competency in direct patient care settings have been achieved. In the United States, ÊPT clinical experiences are becoming more difficult for academic programs to secure, particularly for level-one experiences. Clinicians who agree to mentor students are challenged by time constraints and the need to meet site productivity demands. Clinician productivity has been cited as a barrier to offering student clinical placements. However, the effect of PT student clinical experiences on clinician productivity is not definitive in the literature.ÊThe purpose of this study was twofold, to determine 1) what impact student placements have on PT clinician productivity; and 2) whether there is a difference in productivity between clinicians working with a student on their first versus a final clinical experience.ÊMethods/Description: Clinician productivity logs were distributed to the Directors of Clinical Education (DCE) at each of the PT programs in the regional consortium. The DCEs forwarded the logs to the Center Coordinators of Clinical Education (CCCE) for each level one and final clinical experience during the academic year. The CCCEs distributed the logs to the clinical instructors. Thirty productivity logs were returned with complete data including two weeks of base-line data prior to the studentÕs arrival, and daily productivity data for each week of theÊclinical experience. The logs included questions regarding factors related to productivity. Baseline data for the average number of patients treated, billable treatment units, and initial evaluations (IEs) performed per hour were statistically compared to week 1 and 6 for 30-productivity logs using a 2x4 Repeated Measures ANOVA. In a subset of 17 logs for clinicians working with students for 8 weeks or more, a 2x5 Repeated Measures ANOVA was repeated, adding a comparison of baseline to week 8 to the analysis.ÊResults/Outcomes: ÊThere was no significant difference in productivity for clinicians working with first versus final level students. Comparing week 1 to 6, there was a significant increase in the number of patients seen per week (p = .023) and CPT units billed (p = .016) for both first and final level placements. In the subset of logs of eight or more weeks, there was a significant increase in the number of patients treated per hour at week 6 (F1,15 = 5.78, p=0.03) and a trend towards a change at week 8 (F1,15= 4.19, p=0.059) when compared to baseline week A. The factors that clinicians selected as impacting productivity were census (25%) followed by staffing (14%). ÊConclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: Clinicians working with both first and final level PT students showed an increase in productivity during the clinical placements. Although this study involved a small sample, these results may encourage increased site availability for both first and final level PT doctoral clinical experiences. ÊReferences: Guide to Physical Therapist Practice. 2nd ed. Alexandria, VA: American Physical Therapy Association; 2001. Rev. June 2003. A Normative Model of Physical Therapist Professional Education: Version 2004. Alexandria, VA: American Physical Therapy Association; 2004. Ê Recker-Hughes C., Pivko S., Mowder-Tinney J.J., Brooks G. (2010) Clinical instructors perspectives on availability, preferences for delivery, and barriers to professional development activities ÊÊJOPTE. 24(2); 19-25. ÊÊ Ê Recker-Hughes, C., Mowder-Tinney, JJ., Pivko, S., Brooks, G. 2009. Clinical instructors perspectives on rights and privileges offered by workplace and affiliated academic programs to support their clinical faculty roles. Platform Presentation, Combined Sections Conference, Las Vegas, NA Ê Recker-Hughes C, Pivko S, Mowder-Tinney J.J., Brooks G. (2008). Clinical instructorsÕ self-perceptions of competence in teaching core content areas of curriculum to professional DPT students: Implications for academic programs.Ê JOPTE: 22(2) Fall; 51-59 Ê Lekkas P, Larsen T, Kumar S, Grimmer K, Nyland L, Chipchase L, Jull G, Buttrum P, Carr L, Finch J. (2007) No model of clinical education for physiotherapy students is superior to another: a systematic review. J of Australian Physiotherapy 53: 19-28. Ê Strohschein J, Hagler P, May L. (2002) Assessing the Need for Change in Clinical Education Practices. Phys Ther: 82: 160-172 Ê Embracing Standards in Clinical Education, a Consensus Conference on Standards in Clinical Education, December13-15, 2007, American Physical therapy Association, http://www.apta.org/AM/Template.cfm?Section=Home&TEMPLATE=/CM/ContentDisplay.cfm&CONTENTID=50783, Accessed on 8/17/2010 Ê Leiken A, Method to Determine the Effect of Clinical Education on Production in a Health Care Facility, Physical Therapy. 1983; 63 (1) p56-59 Ê Ladyshewsky RK, Enhancing service productivity in acute acare inpatient settings using collaborative clinical education model. Physical Therapy. 1995 Dec; 75 (12)1137-9 Ê Dillon L, Tomaka J, Chriss C, et al., The Effect of Student Clinical Experiences on Clinician Productivity. J Allied Health. 2003; 31:261-265

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  • Control #: 1996194
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: Susan E. Pivko, Laurel Abbruzzese, Pragati Duttaroy, Ruth Hansen, Kathy Ryans
  • Keywords:

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