The Social Media Magic in Clinical Education to Enhance Communication during Clinical Internships in the 21st Century

Purpose: As physical therapy is rapidly progressing beyond Vision 2020,1 so also is the world advancing in the social media context. Consequently, social media tools such as Facebook, Twitter, Skype, Texting,2 etcÊare becoming increasingly prevalent in professional work environments including use by students, clinicians, and educators to communicate amongst themselves during clinical internships. Though these tools assist in facilitating communication and connectivity between users, if improperly used, they may also subject the users to professional liability.3 Hence it is incumbent on educational programs to ensure a sound understanding of social media. The purpose of this presentation is to explain varied avenues of social media, describe strategies to overcome barriers to use of social media as a pedagogical teaching mechanism, and highlight ethical/legal considerations to assist clinicians, faculty, and students enhance their communication appropriately via social media during clinical education experiences to move physical therapy forward.Methods/Description: The DPT program designed a two pronged approach for the teaching and learning of ethical-legal social media by students, and clinical faculty. Firstly, upon admission, students are instructed in social media policy.4 This discussion is reiterated prior to internships, and DCE discusses with students, the varied appropriate modes of communication with peers, clinical & academic faculty using social media, and consequences for inappropriate uses with specific examples. Subsequently, students share their own experiences regarding social media use with DCE during midterm visits and after completion of internships. Secondly, clinical faculty is informed of DPT programÕs social media policy at clinical educatorÕs workshops to encourage questions, discussion, and solicit collaborative consent. Policy mailings, and midterm visits are used to reach additional clinical faculty to ensure maximal outreach of this information to clinical faculty. ÊResults/Outcomes: DPT program has successfully educated students and clinical faculty on proper use of social media. Student and clinical faculty assessments over past year were very favorable of DPT programÕs efforts to ensure ethical-legal use of social media. Both students and faculty indicated that the two pronged approach to teaching and learning this content was preferred as each group was informed on the DPT programÕs outlook towards social media.Conclusions/Relevance to the conference theme: Shaping the Future of Physical Therapy Education: Learning the essentials of varied types of social media is necessary to developing a sound understanding of the appropriate use of such technology while sharing information in an ethical and legal manner to avoid professional liability in clinical education. The clinician, faculty, student pedagogical teaching and learning is key for shaping the future of physical therapy clinical education; and the methodology presented above may be adapted for use by any physical therapy education program with some modification per curriculum needs.References: 1. Beyond Vision 2020. American Physical Therapy Association Web site. http://www.apta.org/BeyondVision2020/. Accessed April 6, 2014. 2. Social Media Use in Nursing Education. The Online Journal of Issues In Nursing Education. 2012;70(3).Ê http://www.nursingworld.org/MainMenuCategories/ANAMarketplace/ANAPeriodicals/OJIN/TableofContents/Vol-17-2012/No3-Sept-2012/Social-Media-in-Nursing-Education.html. Accessed April 6, 2014. 3. Dougherty, A. Professionalism & Social Networking. American Physical Therapy Association Web site. http://www.apta.org/PTinMotion/2010/6/Feature/ProfessionalismandSocialNetworking/. Accessed April 6, 2014. 4. University of South Dakota Physical Therapy Program. University of South Dakota School of Health Sciences Department of Physical Therapy Student Handbook; 2012-2013:62-65. https://myu.usd.edu/uPortal/render.userLayoutRootNode.uP?uP_root=root&uP_sparam=activeTab&activeTab=2. Accessed April 6, 2014. Ê

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  • Control #: 1996352
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: ELC2014
  • Authors: Joy R. Karges, Aliya N. Chaudry
  • Keywords:

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