The Collaborative Model of Clinical Education: Perceptions of Physical Therapist Clinical Instructors

Purpose/Hypothesis : Quality clinical education (CE) placement in settings with valuable learning opportunities is increasingly important. Literature supports the collaborative model of CE (one clinical instructor mentoring more than one student) as a successful model for both learning and optimizing placements. Although well described in physical therapist literature, the model has not become common practice. The purpose of this report is to describe perceptions of physical therapist clinical instructors (CIs) towards the collaborative model of CE to understand their knowledge, perceived advantages, disadvantages, and barriers of the model.Number of Subjects : 363Materials/Methods : An email invitation to complete a 24-question web-based survey was sent to 2932 physical therapist CIs and/or Center Coordinators of Clinical Education affiliated with one physical therapist program in the Clinical Performance Instrument. Descriptive analysis and cross tabulation were performed.Results : The response rate was 12%. Of the 363 qualified respondents representing 22 states, 58% were DPTs, 49% practiced for 1-10 years and 30% for 11-20 years, 67% were Credentialed CIs, 10% were Advanced Credentialed CIs; 43% practiced in an outpatient setting, 26% in acute care, and 19% in inpatient rehabilitation; and 24% previously served as CIs in the collaborative model. Respondents reported the major advantages of the collaborative model were the development of teamwork skills (71%), receipt of peer feedback (71%), and provision of peer feedback (65%). Major disadvantages of the collaborative model included reduced one-on-one time with the student (67%), time required to complete student assessments (64%), and difficulty providing supervision (61%). Major barriers were limited physical space (53%), achievement of productivity requirements (36%), and lack of support from management (19%). Respondents who had been CIs in a collaborative experience were more likely than those without collaborative experience to agree on the following (p<0.001): sufficient evidence exists to support the collaborative model of CE, the collaborative model is feasible, improves the quality of physical therapy and the productivity of the CI, and they were confident in their ability to provide clinical instruction in the collaborative model.Conclusions : CI perceptions of advantages of the collaborative model of CE included opportunities for teamwork and feedback while disadvantages included time management and supervision. The perceived barriers involved physical and economic factors of the clinical sites and the necessary support. CIs who have participated in a collaborative model had more positive perceptions regarding the model than those CIs without experience with this model.Clinical Relevance : Identification of CIsÕ knowledge and perceived advantages, disadvantages, and barriers of the collaborative model of CE may assist in planning education for implementation of the model. Further work is needed to delineate the efficacy of the collaborative model of CE and the role it may play in the future of CE.

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  • Control #: 2007188
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Susan S. Tomlinson, Brian F. Olkowski, Janet Readinger, Stephen Banks
  • Keywords: clinical education|collaborative model|clinical instructors

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