Utilizing Simulation To Promote Interprofessional Education Throughout a PT Curriculum: A Preliminary Study

Purpose : Educators are responsible for developing students into entry-level practitioners, capable of interprofessional practice. In 2013 CAPTE adopted the core competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice (IPEC)1as a component of the entry-level physical therapist(PT) core curricula to meet this need. Other disciplines have used high and low fidelity simulation to integrate IPEC2,3,4,5. This presentation illustrates early adoption of IPEC using simulation into a PT curriculum at distinct touch points.Description : Three courses in a single university were selected for phase one IPEC implementation. Three distinct simulations were written to address IPEC competencies of communication, professional roles and responsibilities. The Foundations course integrated an interprofessional simulation with PT students and role-played nurses(RNs) to address team communication. An interprofessional simulation was used in the Professional Development course to assess communication skills and knowledge of PT students, RNs and physician assistants (PAÕs) roles and responsibilities using actual PAÕs. A third simulation incorporated a team based simulation in Neuro Management with PT students and role-played RNs to assess clinical decision- making and communication with nursing in response to adverse or unexpected medical situations. Each experience was followed by structured debriefing lead by trained faculty to promote student reflection and learning.Summary of Use : A total of 168 students participated in groups of 4-5. Although each simulation experience was unique, common observations from faculty and students obtained from discussions and reflection papers after the experiences arose. Students demonstrated increased professionalism and engagement with the heath care team in the simulation experiences compared to standard laboratory exercises. There was a mismatch between student performance and faculty expectations regarding studentsÕ understanding of the role of the RN and PA providing meaningful information for future course work. Students reported learning from participating and from observing peers in the simulations, and described the experience as realistic and helpful in promoting learning for clinical practice. Strengths included the ability to provide realistic application and assessment of IPEC as part of didactic coursework prior to clinical. Limitations included an inability to utilize actual RNs, and decreased individual participation due to group activities.Importance to Members: This phase 1 implementation of feasible and beneficial simulation education to promote IPEC competencies in a single PT program provides evidence for other programs looking to infuse interprofessional education within simulation in their own programs. Members considering implementing IPEC education through simulation should weigh the benefits of simulation compared individual lab activities. Further research, and ongoing IPEC education, is needed to promote entry-level PTÕs as interprofessional healthcare providers.

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  • Control #: 2012863
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Kristin C. Greenwood, Sheri R. Kiami, Alicia Canali, Mary J. Hickey, Maura Iversen
  • Keywords: interprofessional education|physical therapy|simulation

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