Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Across Six Health Professions: Are All Student Attitudes the Same?

Purpose/Hypothesis : Interprofessional education (IPE) and interprofessional care advocates for professionals to work in teams to address patient care issues. Students in different professional programs may have unique attitudes toward health care teams based on preexisting knowledge of professions and selected professions. The purpose of this study was to investigate the attitudes students in six health professions have toward health care teams and roles of members on the team. We hypothesized significant differences would be found among student groups related to attitudes of quality of care and care processes, and shared roles of team members.Number of Subjects : A total of 1,285 students were surveyed, including 383 MD students, 234 nursing students (BS RN), 183 graduate (APN) nursing students, 91 DPT and 71 OT students, and 323 Pharm D students. DPT / OT data were combined due to no significant differences.Materials/Methods : We administered the Attitudes Toward Health Care Teams Scale (ATHCTS) prior to an IPE training of six student groups for two academic years. The ATCHTS comprises 2 attitudinal dimensions related to the quality and process of team based care and to the physician's central role on the team. Using Rasch analysis, we performed differential item function analysis (DIF) to assess significant item differences among group attitudes across the two dimensions of the ATHCTS. Chi-squared statistics and t-tests were used to assess for group differences per item, and post-hoc analysis for item-group comparisons. Significant item DIF was defined as p?.0003 (Bonferonni correction for 180 item-group comparisons) and an item logit difference of ? .64 logits.Results : The results demonstrate significant group differences for all items of the ATHCTS, X2 (4, N ? 162) = 11.6, p ? .02). Post-hoc analysis demonstrated the MD student group had sig greater endorsement of items related to physician centrality in the team role compared to APN (p?.0001), DPT/OT (p?.0001), and Pharm D (p?.0001) student groups. The MD and BS RN group demonstrated significant differences (p?.0001) in 2 of the 4 physician centrality items. The MD group also had significantly lower endorsement in most ATHCTS items compared to other groups for items reflecting quality and process of team based care. DPT/OT students demonstrated similar attitudes with the APN group (no significant item DIF across the two dimensions), while BS RN students demonstrated similar attitudes with the Pharm D students.Conclusions : The findings suggest that professional attitudes about team quality of care and care processes, and physician centrality may be unique. While some student groups were similar in attitudinal orientation, the MD students are unique relative to other groups.Clinical Relevance : IPE often occurs without an understanding of preexisting attitudes students have, and the development of IPE curriculum may benefit from addressing both the shared attitudes as well as addressing attitudes that are not shared across groups - particularly with regard to the position of the physician on the patient care team.

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  • Control #: 2012916
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Don D. Straube, Mary T. Keehn, Alana D. Steffen, Valerie Gruss, Annette L. Valenta
  • Keywords: Interprofessional Education|Student Attitudes |Rasch Analysis

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