Creation of IPE Using Simulated Patients Through Collaboration with Seven Health Professional Programs

Purpose : Interprofessional education (IPE) in health profession training is recognized as a key to improving patient care. Though recognized as important, implementation remains a challenge for many health profession programs.Research has shown that interprofessional collaboration improves patient care and outcomes, reduces medical errors, and enhances job satisfaction and retention. D'Youville College created IPE curricula to prepare different HP students to work together cohesively and collaboratively.Description : The seven health profession (HP) programs at DÕYouville College initiated IPE using simulation with professional actors serving as simulated patients and family. Faculty from chiropractic, dietetics, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy and physician assistant programs collaborated in a year-long implementation process to create a four scenario curricula following one patient through multiple medical events called : A Year in the Life of Chris Dulles. The curricula were based on four student learning objectives identified as Core Competencies for Interprofessional Collaborative Practice. One learning objective was identified from each of the four areas: values/ethics, roles/responsibilities, interprofessional communication and specific team and teamwork competencies (VE4, RR1, CC2, TT3). Each case scenario was portrayed similarly within the learning objectives, however was not held to a stringent script. This strategy allowed the actors to respond to the behaviors and cues they received from the student learners as the scenario unfolded in real time. A total of 285 students from seven HP programs participated in one of 30 four-hour simulation sessions in one semester. Each session had 9 to 15 student-learners, led by 2 to 3 faculty debriefers and lasted four hours.Summary of Use : Program evaluation involved seeking feedback from student learners and faculty facilitator/debriefers. A brief, open-ended survey, called the one-minute evaluation was completed by the student learners. Faculty feedback was collected via a forty-four question online survey. Students reported enhanced understanding and respect of professional roles and responsibilities and ability to communicate effectively. Faculty reported an ability to encourage interaction and collaboration among HP students. Suggestions for curricular improvements and program sustainability included professional development and compensation for faculty.Importance to Members: All PT and PTA education programs may benefit from embedding IPE curricula using simulated patients as a low cost alternative to manikin simulation in order to prepare students to function effectively on patient-centered interprofessional teams. Keys to success included: Collaboration amongst the seven HP programs;College administration support; and Faculty professional development. Developing a more robust assessment of student learning using video analysis is the next step in validating the IPE curricula.

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  • Control #: 2017702
  • Type: Platform
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Lynn Rivers, Karen Panzarella, Patricia Nowakowski
  • Keywords: interprofessional teaching and collaboration|simulation|patient simulation technology

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