Developing Interprofessional Education Competencies: Effectiveness of a Problem Based Learning Experience

Purpose/Hypothesis : The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of an interprofessional (IPE) problem based learning (PBL) experience on the self-rated achievement of IPE learning objectives related to values/ethics, roles/responsibilities and interprofessional communication.Number of Subjects : 77 second year Master of Arts in Occupational Therapy and 83 first year Doctor of Physical Therapy students participated in this study (n=160).Materials/Methods : Groups of 8-10 OT and PT students co-facilitated by an OT and PT faculty member or clinician participated in a structured PBL experience involving a case scenario portraying an individual with a diagnosis of stroke. The PBL experience was an embedded course component and consisted of two 3 hour sessions separated by 2 weeks. In session one, guiding questions facilitated student review of the neuroscience of stroke, the medical record and exploration of PT and OT tests and measures. Prior to the second session, students worked in OT/PT pairs to outline an examination plan. In the second session, students discussed each profession's practice framework and student pairs demonstrated portions of the examination with a mock patient. Before and after the PBL experience, students rated their ability to perform seven IPE objectives on a 4 point Likert scale ranging from very poorly (1) to very well (4). Descriptive statistics and Chi-Square statistical tests were used to compare student perceptions of their performance on each objective before and after the PBL experience.Results : Student performance ratings shifted from poor and well to well and very well from pre- to post-test across all seven objectives. A total of 176 poor ratings were recorded at pre-test and 9 poor ratings were recorded at post-test. Prior to the PBL experience the objective with the highest number of poor ratings was "recognize and respect some of the unique cultures, values, roles/responsibilities and expertise of the physical therapy/occupational therapy profession". This objective also had the greatest decrease in number of poor ratings from pre- to post-PBL experience (from 42 to 0). Chi-square analyses were statistically significant (p<.001) for all seven objectives indicating that the findings were significantly different than would be predicted by chance.Conclusions : A PBL experience with OT and PT students resulted in significant improvement in self-rated performance on 7 IPE objectives related to values/ethics, roles/responsibilities and interprofessional communication. Future exploration of the potential value associated with the inclusion of additional health professions in the PBL experience as well as the placement of the experience within the program curricula is warranted.Clinical Relevance : With the advent of the Affordable Care Act, interest in how improved interprofessional education and practice might assist health care organizations to deliver high quality care in a cost effective manner has intensified. PBL experiences such as the one described here may be an effective means to develop IPE competencies in students.

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  • Control #: 2018842
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Lisa Dutton, Kathleen M. Matuska, David D. Chapman, Barbara Gilbertson
  • Keywords: Interprofessional education|problem based learning

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