The Effect of Spatial Ability on Accuracy of Exercise Performance

Purpose/Hypothesis : The objective of this study was to assess the effect of spatial ability (SA) on exercise performance administered by interactive media in individuals aged 50 and older.Number of Subjects : Nine participants volunteered for the study, five females and four males. The mean age was 55.0±5.4.Participants were screened to insure there were no physical factors that might prevent them from safely performing the activities.Materials/Methods : This study was a single factor, two group, post-test only design. The independent variable was SA as determined by the combined scores on two tests of spatial ability, the Santa Barbara Solids Test (SBST) and the Visualization of Views Test (VV). The dependent variable was performance on a yoga exercise program. The Your Shape 2012 video game software compared participant positions read by the Kinect¨ sensor to the presented yoga poses, and produced an accuracy score. This score, as well as an animated representation of the participant, appeared on screen during the exercise program, but only the animated representation was visible to participants. We recorded this score for the warrior I, warrior II, warrior III, lunge reach and tree yoga poses, generating a total of ten scores per participant. We omitted the spine warm-up, rooted breathing and plie chi poses due to excessive movement requirements. A Mann Whitney U test was performed to compare the effect of SA on performance of 10 yoga poses. Exploratory analyses included: comparison of performance on each yoga pose across all participants, and correlation of SBST and VV scores. We compared performance on each yoga pose using a related samples Friedman's Two-Way Analysis of Variance by Ranks to assess the consistency of the participants' performances and scoring by the Kinect¨ sensor. We investigated the correlation of the SBST and VV scores to assess concurrent validity of these tests for spatial ability.Results : The median SA score was 19.4 (range,15.5). Five participants were classified as high spatial ability while four were classified as low spatial ability. There was no difference between high and low spatial ability groups on Kinect¨ scores (p=0.905). The Friedman's Two-Way ANOVA by Ranks revealed significant differences in the distributions of each yoga pose across all participants. The correlation between SBST and VV scores was fair (r=0.486, p=0.185).Conclusions : The findings of this study suggest that patientsÕ SA may not affect their comprehension of interactive media, and thus supports its use as a physical therapy intervention tool. Any conclusions must be considered in the light of the small sample size and the narrow range of scores on the two measures of SA.Clinical Relevance : The relationship between spatial ability and patientsÕ comprehension of interactive media may not affect exercise performance. IThis study supports the use of the Xbox Kinect¨ as a physical therapy intervention tool, since patients may benefit from its visual instruction regardless of their ability to mentally manipulate images.

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  • Control #: 2026357
  • Type: Poster
  • Event/Year: CSM2015
  • Authors: Phillip B. Palmer, Thomas E. Jackson, Luke Lin, Tyler J. Musselwhite, Gloicie D. Pruitt
  • Keywords: Home Exercise Program|Computer gaming|Exercise Performance

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